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Diminished Capacity Isn’t the End of an Active Life

Posted by Anetta Townsend on Feb 28, 2012 9:31:00 AM

adl retirement assisted living waby Anetta Townsend – Director of Care

There are some common misunderstandings among seniors that can keep them from experiencing more of what life has to offer. One of the biggest fears that seniors have is that their physical or mental capacities will be diminished and that they’ll lose the ability to enjoy life.

Unfortunately, many seniors (and even their adult children) equate assisted living with a life of confinement, isolation, loneliness, and boredom. That’s a misconception that keeps too many seniors from getting the help they need—and therefore, from getting more out of life.

Assisted living provides care for seniors that need help with what are commonly called “Activities of Daily Living” (ADL). The chart below (from the Senior Care Society) gives you an idea of what some of these ADLs are.

Function

Independent

Needs Help

Dependant

Does Not Do

Bathing

 

 

 

 

Dressing

 

 

 

 

Grooming

 

 

 

 

Oral Care

 

 

 

 

Toileting

 

 

 

 

Transferring

 

 

 

 

Walking

 

 

 

 

Climbing Stairs

 

 

 

 

Eating

 

 

 

 

Shopping

 

 

 

 

Cooking

 

 

 

 

Managing Medications

 

 

 

 

Using the Phone

 

 

 

 

Housework

 

 

 

 

Doing Laundry

 

 

 

 

Driving

 

 

 

 

Managing Finances

 

 

 

 

Not every individual receiving assisted living care requires help in every area. And even those residents that require more help (in areas such as bathing, dressing, or even walking) don’t have to forego interesting and engaging activities. Quality assisted care facilities encourage residents to participate in as many events as they want. It’s not unusual to see “mixed” groups of people that require assistance involved with other residents that are completely independent.

Sometimes seniors fear that by receiving assistance with some of the ADLs that they will forfeit their independence. It’s an understandable fear, but good assisted living care can actually free a senior up to be more independent—enjoying the activities he or she wants to pursue without having to worry about the things that are difficult (or impossible) for them to do on their own.

Needing a little extra help doesn’t mean that you or a loved have to give up an active life. If you’d like to know more about assisted living care at Daystar—and some of the activities available to our assisted living residents, please shoot us an email, or give us a call at 206-937-6122 or 888-848-5050 (toll free)!

Tags: Senior Living 101

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